nes-maze-audit

Audit Your Brand

by Alexander MorseAlexander Morse is a digital designer and brand consultant at Morse Communication Design. He helps businesses communicate with design. His creative techniques and communication design skills were fostered through his agency-side experience working with a variety of clients from entertainment to retail. He is now focused on end-user, persona-driven interactive and conceptual design […]

by Alexander Morse

Alexander Morse is a digital designer and brand consultant at Morse Communication Design. He helps businesses communicate with design. His creative techniques and communication design skills were fostered through his agency-side experience working with a variety of clients from entertainment to retail. He is now focused on end-user, persona-driven interactive and conceptual design for consumer brands, non-profits, and clients whose message needs to be driven through impactful design.

nes-maze

Make your Brand More Relevant

by Alexander MorseAlexander Morse is a digital designer and brand consultant at Morse Communication Design. He helps businesses communicate with design. His creative techniques and communication design skills were fostered through his agency-side experience working with a variety of clients from entertainment to retail. He is now focused on end-user, persona-driven interactive and conceptual design […]

by Alexander Morse

Alexander Morse is a digital designer and brand consultant at Morse Communication Design. He helps businesses communicate with design. His creative techniques and communication design skills were fostered through his agency-side experience working with a variety of clients from entertainment to retail. He is now focused on end-user, persona-driven interactive and conceptual design for consumer brands, non-profits, and clients whose message needs to be driven through impactful design.

printing-press

Special Printing Techniques for Graphic Design

Special printing techniques can help you differentiate the way you represent your business, from business cards to direct mail. Here are some production approaches you can make when approaching a design project.

printing on fabric

Printing on fabric

spot uv

Spot UV Printing application on wiper blade packaging

  • UV Coating: This treatment will give you protection from UV rays. But you don’t want to for color fade protection. If you print with a spot UV coating, it will allow you to make certain areas of your card have a glossy shine, making content pop.
  • Screen printing: The technique that is used to make t-shirts can be beneficial as if you are printing on a darker paper. The ink will lay on top of the paper instead of getting absorbing into the paper like traditional commercial printing inks.
  • Folding: Go beyond a standard 2″ x 3.5″ business card size. Create a card with a gatefold or a reveal. hand over a business card that is valuable enough to come in it’s own sheath.
die cut printing

Die cuts allow you to create passthrough teases to content that will be revealed.

  • Diecut: Cut right through your card for an effect that can be used for initials or create shapes that highlight your business.
  • Paper Stock: Try an uncoated paper stock. The tactile nature will give people used to interacting with coated paper in magazine and commercial printing application a distinct perception of quality. Uncoated paper choices include laid, linen, column and felt, amongst others.
  • Emboss: Why print ink on a card when you can smash a customized die strike against paper to create any image you want. If you add a little color to the paper emboss it can create a dramatic effect. If you don’t print anything, it’s called a blind emboss. Be careful, it made be hard to read small letters.
  • Letterpress: Hipsters love Gutenburg. The original printing press was letterpress. Inked wood or steel letters pressed against paper create both a light emboss treatment and inked paper.
  • Foil Stamping: Think hallmark holiday cards, but beyond gold and silver. You can stamp blue, color-shifting foil, black foil to create cards that shine.
printing on plastic

Four color printing on plastic

  • Unusual materials: Current printing technologies allow for all surface printing. Fabrics, transparent and colored plastics, wood veneers, metallic surfaces. Lenticular lenses can create animation techniques when you rotate the card.
  • Pantone Matching System colors (PMS): Offset and digital printing standards mix cyan, magenta, yellow and black to reproduce most colors for realistic photographic reproduction on surfaces. However there are some colors like vivid orange, bright pure colors and fluorescents that are impossible to reproduce in CMYK. Pantone colors are speciality colors created by the Pantone corporation for specifying exact color matches and unique colors not offered by CMYK including metallics and pastels. Designers select colors from a printed book, choose them and printers can reproduce that color instead of matching colors from computer screens that don’t match.

By realizing you have an opportunity to utilize some of these formats you can help position and communicate your business as a premium solution instead of the cheapest solution.

by Alexander Morse

Alexander Morse is a digital designer and brand consultant at Morse Communication Design. He helps businesses communicate with design. His creative techniques and communication design skills were fostered through his agency-side experience working with a variety of clients from entertainment to retail. He is now focused on end-user, persona-driven interactive and conceptual design for consumer brands, non-profits, and clients whose message needs to be driven through impactful design.

facebook video ads

Facebook Video Ads are Hotter Than Yesterday’s TV spot

facebook video ads

Millennials don’t watch TV they watch Facebook.

They have Netflix up on their screen and an iPad with Facebook in front of them. If they have kids, the kids have the big screen and the parents have an earphone popped into a laptop with a Facebook window open somewhere. This is where Americans are, this is where your brand needs to be, subliminally working your message into content your audience is already engaged in.

The Average American Spends 40 Minutes Per Day on Facebook.

Facebook Video Ads are the new 30-sec TV spot.

Videos on Facebook get more engagement than any other type of Facebook ad. On YouTube, viewers are more likely to skip video ads interrupting their programming as soon as the 3 second delayed SKIP button is available.

Facebook’s page scrolling, and modular content, creates a content consuming environment more natural for video viewing. 39 Celsius conducted A YouTube vs Facebook video effectiveness test, demonstrating the value and quality Facebook advertisers are getting over YouTube marketers.

Video is all over the web, but Facebook is the place to be.

2016 confirms the trend line that video consumption on Facebook is surpassing Google’s YouTube for the number one video format.  In November 2014 the trend line of Facebook video posts surpassed that of YouTube. Just ask YouTube freebooters out there. Don’t know what a freebooter is? YouTube content creators are getting their creative content pirated from YouTube and uploaded into pirate’s Facebook accounts. This often resulting in the freebooters getting more views than the original YouTube creators. Facebook is being criticized for taking days to respond to complaints. Once they get around to it, the damage is done and the videos get millions of views resulting in more time being spent in the Facebook ecosystem.

Video is king. If video is not your current method for getting content to your audience, find a way to make it so. If you are already getting your message out there with video, great! You can use Facebook user algorithms to enhance your media buying dexterity. Target your audience granularly, based on user interests, demographics and life events. You are able to specify geolocation, age, income, interests, and hobbies to a tee. You have precision control to be able to exclude people, such as fans of your Facebook page, or people you are already targeting by other means. Targeting frequent travelers? Options allow you to focus on travel history, such as, recent travel to certain areas.

video play button on fire

Video content is the best visual content that will get you more viewers. Facebook video ads are given favorable treatment in user timelines compared to other visual ad format. Video content producers get the most engagement on Facebook, more than any other type of paid content post. Facebook states that in late November 2015 it hit a milestone of 8 Billion Daily Video Viewsdoubling since April. Keep in mind,  Facebook counts a video impression or Cost Per View (CPV), if a video up on the screen for at least three seconds. Since videos are auto play, users who are slow scrollers can trigger video auto play and may be counted as a view although they didn’t perceive any video content.

Track impressions and performance to the second. Facebook’s video metrics let you track individual video performance and retention, second by second. This allows you to craft different versions of your video and experiment with edits or content that may perform better and  have longer retention times than the previous effort.

A video ad will not just perform successfully on its own based on the sweat equity you invested in it.

You need to provide content that doesn’t violate the unwritten rules of Facebook engagement. Facebookers are interested in social consuming and sharing mode, give them something visual, relevant, and valuable that is tailored to their interests and maybe work in a marketing message at the end of the video.

Facebookers are in social consuming and sharing mode, give them something visualrelevant, and valuable to them that is tailored to their interests

Set aside some of your marketing budget for Facebook video ads. It’s a worthy way of getting quality branded content out there, from product placement to emotional testimonials. This digital marketing platform is going to soon be called traditional advertising as it should be in the toolkit for most marketers.

by Alexander Morse

Alexander Morse is a digital designer and brand consultant at Morse Communication Design. He helps businesses communicate with design. His creative techniques and communication design skills were fostered through his agency-side experience working with a variety of clients from entertainment to retail. He is now focused on end-user, persona-driven interactive and conceptual design for consumer brands, non-profits, and clients whose message needs to be driven through impactful design.

rebecca lynch the rescue realtor

Brand Identity Launched for Rebecca Lynch, The Rescue Realtor

rebecca lynch the rescue realtorRebecca Lynch, The Rescue Realtor is a real estate agent with a passion for more than just finding you a home in Orlando.

I had the privilege of designing a brand identity for Rebecca Lynch, now known as The Rescue Realtor.

I met Rebecca through our co-volunteering efforts with Poodle and Pooch Rescue of Florida. She has a love for Orlando and a love for dogs and dog rescue, which defines her personal brand. She combined the two into a real estate service that gives back to dogs and animal welfare organizations. She donates a part of her real estate commissions to non-profit Poodle and Pooch Rescue or other 501c3 animal welfare organizations of her client’s choosing.

When you put effort into an innate passion that people can naturally believe in, marketing a service becomes humane instead of a hard sell.

I witnessed her transform a part-time calling to help dogs in need into a full-time effort to help people and dogs. This struck a chord with me. It reminded me that some personal brands are intrinsically born with emotional currency, which is forever sought after in marketing and advertising. When you put effort into an innate passion that people can naturally believe in, marketing a service becomes humane instead of a hard sell.

rebecca-lynch-the-rescue-realtorIf a client can understand the joy of having a dog(s) in the home, Rebecca is certainly a choice real estate agent to help guide them in the aspects of selecting a home appropriate for their family, with special considerations for their furry friend.

The logo design

The brand identity features a dog holding a set of keys underneath the casual handcrafted script, “Rescue”. Clients who find The Rescue Realtor online are reminded by the dog with the keys, that it was their love for dogs that led them to an Orlando real estate agent who cares about finding clients and dogs alike the right home.

Her passion for finding everyone the right home can be summed up in a brand promise, “Everyone Deserves the Home of their Dreams”.

About Rebecca:

Rebecca Lynch is a full time licensed professional real estate advisor. Rebecca has lived in Central Florida for the past 20 years. Prior to becoming a real estate agent, Rebecca owned her own business working with title companies, closing real estate transactions and spent the last ten years employed as a supervisor for a large insurance company.

rebecca lynchRebecca is on the board of directors as the President of Poodle and Pooch Rescue of Florida, working with volunteers to rescue dogs abandoned and neglected dogs. Rebecca and her team of nearly 100 volunteers save as many lives as possible to treat, spay and neuter and re-home dogs in need.

“Finding my clients a home, helps our pets to find a home. For me, there’s nothing more rewarding.” -Rebecca Lynch

As a realtor specializing in residential properties, Rebecca brings abundant energy, creativity, dedication and personal knowledge to her work. Rest assured that she stays on top of details to ensure a smooth transaction and is always working in her client’s best interest. If you’re looking for a dedicated, hard working, ethical, round the clock agent, look no further, it would be Rebecca’s pleasure to welcome you home.

by Alexander Morse

Alexander Morse is a digital designer and brand consultant at Morse Communication Design. He helps businesses communicate with design. His creative techniques and communication design skills were fostered through his agency-side experience working with a variety of clients from entertainment to retail. He is now focused on end-user, persona-driven interactive and conceptual design for consumer brands, non-profits, and clients whose message needs to be driven through impactful design.